Did You Know

Did You Know

According to World Health Organization, infection is the #1 cause of death worldwide and the #3 cause of death in the United States. Twenty-five years ago 90% of infections could be controlled by antibiotics. Today that number is less than 50%. US News and World Report says $50 billion or more is spent each year by US business due to absenteeism. Today’s chemicals, disinfectants, and sterilants are causing microorganisms to mutate creating “superbugs”. Mold is now considered a greater threat than asbestos and is far more prevalent. The CDC tells us that 80% of infection is passed by human hands.

Health Care-Associated Infections
​10% 
1 in 10 patients get an infection while receiving care.

The burden of health care-associated infection worldwide
Health care-associated infection (HAI), also referred to as "nosocomial" or "hospital" infection, is an infection occurring in a patient during the process of care in a hospital or other health care facility which was not present or incubating at the time of admission. HAI can affect patients in any type of setting where they receive care and can also appear after discharge. Furthermore, they include occupational infections among staff. HAI represents the most frequent adverse event during care delivery and no institution or country can claim to have solved the problem yet. Based on data from a number of countries, it can be estimated that each year, hundreds of millions of patients around the world are affected by HAI. The burden of HAI is several fold higher in low- and middle-income countries than in high-income ones. There is also now a worldwide consensus that urgent action is needed to prevent and control the spread of antibiotic resistant organisms and in health care effective infection prevention and control (IPC) is one solution.


Read More 

Surgical Site Infections
50%
More than 50% of surgical site infections can be antibiotic-resistant.  

Global guidelines on the prevention of surgical site infection
The first ever Global guidelines for the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI) were published on 3 November 2016, then updated in some parts and published in a new edition in December 2018. They include a list of 29 concrete recommendations on 23 topics for the prevention of SSI in the pre-, intra and postoperative periods, which are based on 28 systematic reviews of the evidence.

For the 2018 update, the membership of the guidelines development group (GDG) was broadened to include an additional eight anaesthesiology experts. The 2018 edition of the guidelines includes the revision of the recommendation regarding the use of 80% fraction of inspired oxygen (high FiO2) in surgical patients under general anaesthesia with tracheal intubation and the update of the section on implementation. Between 2017 and 2018, WHO re-assessed the evidence on the use of high FiO2 by updating the systematic review related to the effectiveness of this intervention to reduce SSI and commissioning an independent systematic review on adverse events potentially associated with it. Based on the updated evidence, the GDG decided to revise the strength of the recommendation from strong to conditional.


Read More